[The Classic Christian Network] Jewish Studies: Jerusalem (2of100) Wiki

Posted: April 8, 2011 in Uncategorized


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NATSZAL – The Jewish Network is not about wierd or wacky; wild or wooly, legalistic or Judaistic. It is about Jesus and studies about Him. Some studies involve discussing Jewish Culture; but this is not a Network in How to Be a Jew or a Gentile, a separatist or exclusivism. This is a Network that presents factual information as it relates to Jewish Studies.

 

Jewish Topical

“Jerusalem”

(2 of 100)

TWO

WIKIPEDIA

Jerusalem (Hebrewיְרוּשָׁלַיִם

‎‎ About this sound (audio) 

·info), YerushaláyimISO 259-3 Yrušalaym, “Abode of Peace”; Arabicالقُدس About this sound (audio) ,al-Quds [al-Sharif], “The Holy Sanctuary”)[ii] is the capital of Israel, though not internationally recognized as such.[iii] If the area and population of East Jerusalem is included, it is Israel’s largest city[1] in both population and area,[2] with a population of 763,800 residents over an area of 125.1 km2 (48.3 sq mi).[3][4][iv] Located in the Judean Mountains, between the Mediterranean Sea and the northern edge of the Dead Sea, modern Jerusalem has grown far beyond the boundaries of the Old City.

 

 

Overview

Given the city’s central position in both Israeli nationalism (Zionism) and Palestinian nationalism, the selectivity required to summarise more than 5,000 years of inhabited history is often[35][36] influenced by ideological bias or background (see Historiography and nationalism). For example, the Jewish periods of the city’s history are important to Israeli nationalists (Zionists), whose discourse suggests that modern Jews descend from the Israelites andMaccabees,[37][38] whilst the IslamicChristian and other non-Jewish periods of the city’s history are important to Palestinian nationalism, whosediscourse suggests that modern Palestinians descend from all the different peoples who have lived in the region.[39][40] As a result, both sides claim the history of the city has been politicized by the other in order to strengthen their relative claims to the city,[35][36][41][42][43] and that this is borne out by the different focuses the different writers place on the various events and eras in the city’s history.

Overview of Jerusalem’s historical periods

Ancient period

Stepped Stone Structure, City of David

Ceramic evidence indicates the occupation of City of David, within present-day Jerusalem, as far back as the Copper Age (c. 4th millennium BCE),[13][44] with evidence of a permanent settlement during the early Bronze Age (c. 3000–2800 BCE).[44][45] The Execration Texts (c. 19th century BCE), which refer to a city called Roshlamem or Rosh-ramen[44] and the Amarna letters (c. 14th century BCE) may be the earliest mention of the city.[46][47] Some archaeologists, including Kathleen Kenyon, believe Jerusalem[48] as a city was founded by Northwest Semitic people with organized settlements from around 2600 BCE. According to Jewish tradition, the city was founded by Shem and Eber, ancestors of Abraham. In the biblicalaccount, Jerusalem (“Salem”) when first mentioned is ruled by Melchizedek, an ally of Abraham (identified with Shem in legend). Later, in the time of Joshua, Jerusalem lay within territory allocated to the tribe of Benjamin (Joshua 18:28), but continued to be under the independent control of theJebusites until it was conquered by David and made into the capital of the united Kingdom of Israel (c. 11th century BCE).[49][50]

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